Youth Trail Crews

Getting Youth Outdoors
27 Years of Service

2019 marks the 27th season of the Quilcene Ranger Corps, a trail stewardship program that provides opportunities for local youth to volunteer in service to their communities and our public lands. Each crew member is paid a stipend for their time.

Each year, multiple QRC Trail Crews from the Quilcene area work to maintain recreation trails on the Olympic National Forest, including the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail. Each trail crew spends two days a week—through the course of an eight week season—exercising teamwork and trail restoration skills. In 2017, students from the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe participated in the QRC program.

“I didn’t think I was capable of moving a 1,000 pound boulder, but we all worked together, and we did it!”  -Tasha S, QRC 2002
Trails Benefit Communities

The town of Quilcene, Washington, located on the Hood Canal of the Olympic Peninsula, has long profited from the natural resources of the Olympic National Forest. Today, Quilcene and surrounding communities also benefit from outdoor recreation opportunities offered by the forest. Together, the PNT, the Olympic National Forest, and Olympic National Park, draw millions of visitors to the public lands in the area, every year. 

2019 marks the 27th season of the Quilcene Ranger Corps. The QRC provides local youth with opportunities to volunteer in service to their community and our public lands.

Partnerships Protect Trails

The Pacific Northwest Trail Association partners the United States Forest Service, Hood Canal Ranger District and the Back Country Horsemen of Washington in the administration and management of the Quilcene Ranger Corps. USFS representatives provide supplemental education to QRC students and help prepare them for a variety of careers in forestry, environmental stewardship, and related fields.  

Throughout the course of the summer, QRC students are taught trail stewardship skills, in accordance with U.S. Forest Service Standards. Instruction is provided with a special emphasis on trail restoration and teamwork.

Together, QRC students serve their communities by keeping trails open and safe for visitors. They also learn about trail stewardship, Leave-No-Trace Ethics, and reap the rewards of personal and group accomplishments in service to our public lands.

“I learned the importance of trails in our community and how to take care of them.”  Emily K, QRC 2002
The PNT in a Coastal Forest in Olympic NP
Coastal forests meet rocky headlands and rugged beaches along the Pacific Coast in Section 10. Photo by Ashley Hill.
Coastal forests meet rocky headlands and rugged beaches along the Pacific Coast in Section 10. Photo by Ashley Hill.
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